CYBER CORNER FOR FRIDAY, AUGUST 29

Posted 2 months ago

By Corey Sorenson

iPhone Closeup by John Pastor, on Flickr

IN THE NEWS: APPLE SETS DATE FOR ANNOUNCING NEW PRODUCTS

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — So, what does Apple have up its sleeve when it comes to new products? We’ll find out next month, when the gadget maker rolls out the latest batch. The September 9 event is set for the same Silicon Valley venue where the company’s late co-founder, Steve Jobs unveiled the original Mac computer 30 years ago. It’s expected Apple will announce a new, larger iPhone — and possibly some other kind of device like a computerized watch. It’s expected to be the most anticipated launch since Apple rolled out the iPad four years ago.

IN THE NEWS: SHOPPING BY PHONE?

NEW YORK (AP) — Used to be that shopping by phone meant placing a call to a company or store, telling them what you want — and having them send it to you. But the new phone-shopping the tech world has in mind would see you snap a photo of an electronic device, piece of clothing or accessory using your smartphone or tablet — then be able to shop for it. So far, no one has been able to master the technology to make it a regular feature of our lives. For example, Amazon’s Firefly phone can make out labels of everyday items. But certain patterns vex the software inside and that can make it hard to complete a purchase.

ON THE WEB: GOOGLE’S DRONES

CYBERSPACE (AP) — Google is the latest company to try to produce a fleet of drones to get packages to people more quickly. The program is a chance for Google to step up its battle with rival Amazon.com — which is also experimenting with using drones to deliver merchandise. Don’t expect to see drones hovering over your heads with packages anytime soon. Google says it expects it to be several more years before it has a fully operational fleet of drones.

IN STORES: WATCHING VIDEO GAMES

NEW YORK (AP) — Those old enough to remember when video games were played only at arcades — not at home — can recall how a crowd would form around the person who was racking up points on the machines. But that was before people got their own video game systems. And now that millions can play high-definition versions of their favorite titles at home — how many people would be interested in watching someone else play? We will soon learn the answer to that question as Twitch becomes more widely known. The online network lets people watch live and recorded footage of other people playing video games. So far, it appears there’s a market for that kind of stuff. There are 55 million monthly users on Twitch — and they viewed over 15 billion minutes of content on the service in July.

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