CYBER CORNER FOR FRIDAY, APRIL 18

Posted 5 months ago

By Corey Sorenson

pandora

IN THE NEWS: PANDORA LAWSUIT FILED BY RECORD LABELS

NEW YORK (AP) — Oldies, but goodies are the latest battleground in the fight between major record labels and a major music streaming service. The labels are suing Internet radio giant Pandora for copyright infringement for using songs recorded before 1972 without paying license fees. The labels — which include divisions of Sony, Warner and Universal — claim songs like Aretha Franklin’s “Respect” and the Beatles’ “Hey Jude” aren’t covered by federal copyright law — but are protected in common law by states, which include New York. The labels say Pandora and similar services have deprived the artists and labels of tens of millions of dollars each year. The labels also sued satellite radio company Sirius XM Holdings Inc. last year in a similar case. Pandora says in a statement that it is “confident in its legal position” and expects the matter to be resolved quickly.

IN THE NEWS: LAWMAKERS IN ARIZONA APPROVE BILL TO STOP “REVENGE PORN”

PHOENIX (AP) — Lawmakers in Arizona are the latest to take a stand against what’s become known as “revenge porn.” The Arizona state senate has given initial approval to a bill that would make it a felony for someone to post nude photos of a person without their written consent. It’s aimed at stopping the practice of jilted lovers from posting explicit pictures of their ex’s to get back at them for leaving the relationship. Last year, California made it a misdemeanor to post such images.

ON THE WEB: TARGET LOOKING TO DELIVER PRODUCTS

CYBERSPACE (AP) — Target is looking to take aim at Amazon.com — by stepping up its delivery service. Target started a subscription service in September, when it offered a number of baby products like wipes and diapers for delivery. Now Target is expanding the program to include things ranging from beauty products to pet supplies to home office supplies. The Target service — and shipping — are free. And there is no minimum on orders, which means you can order a single tube of toothpaste shipped monthly if you want.

IN STORES: AEREO DISPUTE HEADS FOR SUPREME COURT

NEW YORK (AP) — What will become of Aereo — the online service that lets people watch over-the-air TV channels online? The answer to that question will come from the U.S. Supreme Court, which begins hearing arguments on the case next week. Aereo subscribers in New York and 10 other markets can watch shows live or record them using Aereo’s online digital video recorder. The cost: about $8 a month. Subscribers can watch programming with computers, smartphones and other devices, as well as with TVs with streaming devices added on or built in. Broadcasters claim Aereo is trying to get around copyright law — since cable and satellite TV companies typically pay broadcasters to include TV stations in their lineups. Millions of dollars are at stake: If people ditch cable service for Aereo, broadcasters would be able to charge cable companies less.