CSC HOSTS HISTORY DAY

Posted 2 months ago

By John Axtell

National History Day 2014 logoOver 80 Panhandle 6th-12th graders will be at Chadron State College on Friday for the annual Western Nebraska History Day Competition.

Top placers in the Junior (6tj-8th) and Senior (9th-12th) divisions will advance to state and chance to win a slot at the National History Day competition this summer at the University of Maryland.

CSC and the Mari Sandoz High Plains Heritage Center are sponsoring the district event, with the Student Center the competition site.

The National History Competition begins early in the school year with the announcement of the annual theme, this year “Rights and Responsibilities.”

Students…acting as individuals, duos, or teams…then pick a specific historical topic related to that theme and begin researching and creating an entry in one of 5 forms: performance, exhibit, documentary, web site, and research paper.

Mari Sandoz Center director Sarah Polak, herself trained in history and museum studies, says the results the students produce are amazing.

The entries are judged by professional educators and historians, with those chosen as among the best in age division and category move on to the state contest in Lincoln on April 12.  Last year, 15 from the western district reached state.

The competition at CSC begins at 8:30 a.m. and will finish around noon. Most entries will be available for public viewing in the Student Center after the competition.

The roots of National History Day go back to 1974, when history professor Dr. David Van Tassel of Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, Ohio, wanted to reinvigorate the teaching and learning of history in elementary and secondary schools.

Van Tassel put together a one-day contest for students to showcase their historical research and the idea caught on. By 1980, National History Day had grown into a national organization promoting the hands-on  learning of history in a combination of creativity and scholarship that’s made it a leading model of performance-based learning.

More than half a million students took part in National History Day competitions around the country last year and over 5-million have competed over the years.

In 1974, history professor Dr. David Van Tassel of Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, Ohio wanted to reinvigorate the teaching and learning of history in elementary and secondary schools.

What resulted was a one-day contest for students to showcase their historical research called National History Day. Over the next few years, the contest expanded and by 1980 NHD had grown into a national organization involving more than 2 million people each year.

For more than twenty-five years the National History Day program has promoted systemic educational reform related to the teaching and learning of history in America’s schools. The combination of creativity and scholarship built into the program anticipated current educational reforms, making National History Day a leading model of performance-based learning.

- See more at: http://www.csc.edu/modules/news/public_news/view/10603#sthash.ewFJgI2G.dpuf