NONRESIDENT HUNTING OUTFITTERS CONVICTED OF TAKING WILDLIFE ILLEGALLY IN NEBRASKA

Posted 2 months ago

By Corey Sorenson

Nebraska Games and Parks LogoLINCOLN – A North Carolina couple have been convicted of multiple federal game law violations in Nebraska. Jason and Britney Edney of Hendersonville, N.C., own an outfitting company that hired guides and worked for clients in Nebraska.

Over four years, Nebraska Game and Parks Commission conservation officers and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service special agents uncovered hunting violations that included more than 25 instances of overbagging or hunting turkeys without permits, 29 illegally taken deer, 17 instances of failing to check deer and five small game violations. The violations occurred in Frontier, Dawson, Keya Paha and Lincoln counties.

Jason Edney made a plea deal and was convicted of a felony Lacey Act violation. He was ordered to pay $35,000 in restitution and court costs. His five-year probation includes a ban on hunting, fishing or trapping. Nebraska charges against him resulted in an additional $100 in fines, plus court costs.

Britney Edney also made a plea deal and was convicted of a misdemeanor Lacey Act violation. She was ordered to pay $10,000 in restitution and court costs. Her three-year probation includes a ban on hunting, fishing or trapping. She also was charged in Nebraska for hunting without permits and fined $100, plus court costs.

The Lacey Act is a federal law that bans the trade of fish, wildlife and plants that are illegally taken, transported or sold.

Guide and client Jay Myers of Alabama, client Matt Woods of Alabama, and client Greg Voliva of North Carolina each was convicted of a misdemeanor Lacey Act violation. Myers was ordered to pay $1,050 in fines, $4,000 in restitution, plus court costs. Woods was ordered to pay $525 in fines, $4,000 in restitution, plus court costs. Voliva was ordered to pay $525 in fines, $2,000 in restitution, plus court costs.

The Edneys had been part of a reality television series in which teams compete against each other by hunting. Several of the illegal hunts were videotaped for that series and some of the footage was posted online to promote their outfitting business.