CSC STUDENT TEACHERS LEARNING HOW TO ADD WILDLIFE AND NATURE INTO THEIR LESSONS

Posted 1 year ago

By John Axtell

Elementary regional block students from the Chadron State College education department recently had the chance to obtain new ideas on how to incorporate wildlife and nature into their science lessons as well as across the curriculum.

The students attended Project WILD on Oct. 3 and Project WET on Oct. 17. Both workshops were held at Wildcat Hills Nature Center near Gering and were presented by education specialist and park superintendent Amanda Filipi.

Project WILD began in 1983 and is currently offered through the United States and six other countries. It is an interdisciplinary conservation and environmental education program emphasizing wildlife.

The goal of Project WILD is to assist students of any age in developing awareness, knowledge, skills, and commitment to result in informed decisions, responsible behavior, and constructive actions concerning wildlife and the environment. Project WILD’s primary audience is educators of kindergarten through high school students.

Project WET began in 1984 and has dedicated itself to the mission of reaching children, parents, teachers, and communities of the world with water education.

The cornerstone of Project WET is its methodology—teaching about water resources through hands-on, investigative, easy-to-use activities. In addition, Project WET activities also develop skills—teamwork, decision making and problem solving among them—that help prepare learners for the water resource challenges of this century.

“Projects WET and WILD are fantastic experiences for the elementary block students. It gives them a chance to get out of the classroom and work with science lessons in an entertaining and engaging hands-on way. In addition to the numerous free materials the students receive, they also take away a number of science lessons that relate directly to the standards they will be required to teach,” said Dr. Jesse Sealey, assistant professor of education.

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CSC 13 Project WildA group of student teachers from Chadron State College recently had a couple chances to get some new ideas on how to incorporate wildlife and nature into their science lessons and all across the curriculum.

The education majors, on their Elementary regional block, attended two  workshops at the Nebraska Game and Parks Wildcat Hills Nature Center near Gering: Project WILD on Oct. 3 and Project WET on Oct. 17.

Both workshops were presented by Game and Parks education specialist Amanda Filipi.

CSC assistant professor of education Dr Jesse Sealey says “Projects WET and WILD are fantastic experiences for the elementary block students. It gives them a chance to get out of the classroom and work with science lessons in an entertaining and engaging hands-on way.”

Dr Sealey says both programs also give the students many free materials they can use in the classroom, in the field, or preparing curriculum as well as a number of science lessons that relate directly to the standards they will be required to teach.

Project WILD is an interdisciplinary conservation and environmental education program emphasizing wildlife. It began in 1983 and is currently offered through the United States and six other countries. It

Sealey says Project WILD works with kindergarten through high school teachers  to help students of all ages learn more about wildlife and the environment. The goal is for the students to develop a commitment to nature so that they make informed decisions with responsible behavior and constructive actions.

Project WET began in 1984 and has dedicated itself to the mission of bringing water education to children, parents, teachers, and communities around the the world.

Dr Sealey says the cornerstone of Project WET is its methodology—teaching about water resources through hands-on, investigative, easy-to-use activities.

Project WET activities also develop skills—teamwork, decision-making and problem-solving among them—that help prepare learners for the water resource challenges of this century.