NEW CLICK IT OR TICKET IT CAMPAIGN UNDERWAY

Posted 1 year ago

By John Axtell

Click it or ticket - 6The latest edition of the national Click It or Ticket seat belt initiative began its 2-week run Monday, ending on Sunday June 2nd.

Nebraska Governor Dave Heineman, State Patrol Superintendent Colonel Dave Sankey, and State Engineer Randy Peters – who also heads the Nebraska Department of Roads joined together to kick off the state’s 9th year of participation in the program.

62 law enforcement agencies across the state are sharing $357,000 from the Nebraska Office of Highway Safety to cover the overtime costs of providing more than 12,000 hours of additional traffic enforcement during the two-week effort.

The two largest grants are for just under $30,000 to the State Patrol and a little over $26,000 for the Omaha Police Department.

Five of the agencies are in the Panhandle with the Scottsbluff Police Department receiving the largest share at $10,514. The Scotts Bluff County Sheriff’s Office gets $8,400…the Mitchell police $2,636.30…Kimball police $2,355.60, and the Chadron police $1,842.50.

Governor Heineman says the state remains dedicated to continually increasing safety, but can’t do it alone and must depend on the actions of individual drivers…such as using a seat belt.

The number of traffic deaths in Nebraska rose last year for the first time in 3 years…reaching 212. Numbers for the first 4 months of this are at nearly the pace, raising the possibility of another year of increased fatalities.

The Click It or Ticket campaign includes Memorial Day weekend, the unofficial start of the summer travel season, and also comes as highway construction season is gearing up.

Peters says that although workers probably won’t be in work zones over the holiday, those areas still pose addition threats to drivers and require extra caution. He also reminds drivers that fines double for violations in work zones if workers are present.

Colonel Sankey says obeying the posted speed limit, buckling up, and not driving impaired or distracted means that drivers “put the odds of avoiding a citation or surviving a crash in your favor.